Excited to share our paper on flexible strain sensor for monitoring of tumor progression. ✨

Paper title: A flexible electronic strain sensor for the real-time monitoring of tumor progression

Abstract: Healthcare professionals and scientists utilize tumor shrinkage as a key metric to establish the efficacy of cancer treatments. However, current measurement tools such as CT scanners and calipers only provide brief snapshots of the dynamic geometric changes occurring in vivo, and they are unable to detect the micrometer-scale volumetric transformations transpiring at minute timescales. Here we present a stretchable electronic strain sensor, with a 10-micron scale resolution, capable of continuously monitoring tumor volume progression in real-time. In mouse models with subcutaneously implanted lung cancer or B-cell lymphoma tumors our sensors discerned a significant change in the tumor volumes of treated mice within 5 hours after small molecule therapy or immunotherapy initiation. Histology, caliper measurements, and luminescence imaging over a one-week treatment period validated the data from the continuous sensor. We anticipate that real-time tumor progression datasets could help expedite and automate the process of screening cancer therapies in vivo.

Publication:

  1. A flexible electronic strain sensor for the real-time monitoring of tumor progression Alex Abramson, Carmel Chan, Yasser Khan, Alana Mermin-Bunnell, Naoji Matsuhisa, Robyn Fong, Rohan Shad, William Hiesinger, Parag Mallick, Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, and others bioRxiv, 2021

    Healthcare professionals and scientists utilize tumor shrinkage as a key metric to establish the efficacy of cancer treatments. However, current measurement tools such as CT scanners and calipers only provide brief snapshots of the dynamic geometric changes occurring in vivo, and they are unable to detect the micrometer-scale volumetric transformations transpiring at minute timescales. Here we present a stretchable electronic strain sensor, with a 10-micron scale resolution, capable of continuously monitoring tumor volume progression in real-time. In mouse models with subcutaneously implanted lung cancer or B-cell lymphoma tumors our sensors discerned a significant change in the tumor volumes of treated mice within 5 hours after small molecule therapy or immunotherapy initiation. Histology, caliper measurements, and luminescence imaging over a one-week treatment period validated the data from the continuous sensor. We anticipate that real-time tumor progression datasets could help expedite and automate the process of screening cancer therapies in vivo.

    @article{abramson2021flexible, title = {A flexible electronic strain sensor for the real-time monitoring of tumor progression}, author = {Abramson, Alex and Chan, Carmel and Khan, Yasser and Mermin-Bunnell, Alana and Matsuhisa, Naoji and Fong, Robyn and Shad, Rohan and Hiesinger, William and Mallick, Parag and Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam and others}, journal = {bioRxiv}, year = {2021}, doi = {10.1101/2021.09.16.460551}, thumbnail = {abramson2021flexible.png}, url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/2021.09.16.460551}, pdf = {abramson2021flexible.pdf} }

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